Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player




Social Media Policy
By posting on any of Mercy's Social Media sites you are bound by the Social Media Policy

Celebrating 100 Years of Caring for our Community

Perfect Care Scores

The Perfect Care Score shows the percentage of patients cared for at Mercy Medical Center who had all Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) quality measures done perfectly.

 

Heart Attack Patients (AMI)

For patients with a heart attack perfect care means that the patient was given the right medications at the right time and had the appropriate heart tests performed.

 

Heart Attack Patients Given PCI or Angioplasty Within 90 Minutes of Arrival
(Medicare Measure AMI 8a)

This information is taken from http://www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov which is published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  The rates displayed in this graph are from data reported for discharges 07/01/11 through 06/30/12.

Angioplasty is a procedure that helps when a person is having a heart attack.  A doctor performs this procedure to open any blockage that may be occurring.

 

Pneumonia (PN)

For Patients with pneumonia, perfect care means that the patient received the correct antibiotic at the correct time, had blood cultures taken at the right time, was offered the pneumonia vaccine, and, if a smoker, was offered smoking cessation assistance.

Pneumonia Patients Given the Most Appropriate Initial Antibiotic(s)
(Medicare Measure PN6)

This information is taken from http://www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov which is published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  The rates displayed in this graph are from data reported for discharges 07/01/11 through 06/30/12.

Pneumonia is a bacterial infection in the lungs.  When a person gets pneumonia, they often have difficulty breathing, fever, cough, and fatigue.  The sooner a person is able to start antibiotics, the better.

 

Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP)

Surgery Patients Who Were Given an Antibiotic at the Recommended Time Before Surgery

For patients who have had surgery, perfect care means that the doctors and nurses have followed the correct steps to ensure that the surgery has been as safe as possible.

Surgery Patients Who Were Given an Antibiotic at the Right Time (Within One Hour Before Surgery) to Help Prevent Infection
(Medicare Measure SCIP 1)

This information is taken from http://www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov which is published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  The rates displayed in this graph are from data reported for discharges 07/01/11 through 06/30/12.

 

Research shows that if a patient gets an antibiotic within one hour of their surgery they are less likely to get an infection.

Surgery Patients Who Were Given the Right Kind of Antibiotic to Help Prevent Infection
(Medicare Measure SCIP 2a)

This information is taken from http://www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov which is published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  The rates displayed in this graph are from data reported for discharges 07/01/11 through 06/30/12.

Some antibiotics work better than others to prevent infection and the doctors and nurses work to make sure the correct antibiotics have been given to the patient.

Average Time Patient Spent in the Emergency Department Before They Were Seen by a Healthcare Professional
(Medicare Measure OP-20)

This information is taken from http://www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov which is published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  The rates displayed in this graph are from data reported for discharges 01/01/12 through 06/30/12.

Timely and effective care in hospital emergency departments is essential for good patient outcomes.  Delays before receiving care in the emergency department can reduce the quality of care and increase risks and discomfort for patients with serious illnesses or injuries.  Waiting times at different hospitals can vary widely, depending on the number of patients seen, staffing levels, efficiency, admitting procedures, or the availability of inpatient beds.